October 21st, 2015

AppleMacOS_Oct20_AApple’s latest operating system is here, and you’re probably wondering if OS X El Capitan is worth your time. With a bevy of new features, it certainly talks the talk, but does it walk the walk? We’ll help inform your decision by giving you information on some of El Capitan’s new features and how to use them.

Mac users have another choice on their hands after Apple recently released OS X El Capitan. The company claims the OS will make tasks simpler but you, along with every other Mac user, are probably wondering just what has been done to make that statement a reality. Here is a quick look at some of El Capitan’s features and how you can utilize them.

Two for the view of one

One of El Capitan's most anticipated new features is Split Views. By utilizing this feature, you can view two applications side-by-side simultaneously. Say you are working on a document but also need to communicate with colleagues via Skype; before, you would have to resize the windows yourself, and configure everything on your own. With Split Views, you can have both apps running next to each other in fullscreen mode, all in just two clicks.

To use Split Views, click and hold down the green button you see in the upper-left corner of any window you’re using. The current window will open in Split Views on the left half of your screen once you release the button. After that happens, thumbnails of non-minimized apps that are compatible with Split View will show up on your screen. All you have to do is click on the one you want to open. That app will then appear on the right side of the screen. From there you can adjust just how much of the screen each app uses.

Swiper, yes swiping

Apple has done its best to improve the Mail application with the release of El Capitan. The improvements aim to give the Mail app on your desktop or laptop the same functionality it has on your iPhone and iPad. The most notable of these changes to Mail is the swiping feature users can now utilize to delete or mark emails in their inbox.

A two-finger swipe to the left on the trackpad over a message header brings up the familiar red trash button, while a two-finger swipe to the right sees the blue button with Mark as Read or Mark as Unread appear.

Mail also has several new features in fullscreen mode, including the ability to create new tabs for emails you are composing. It works pretty much the same as any web browser; any time you hit the Compose button, a tab with a new blank email will open up at the top of the screen. You can switch back and forth between these by clicking each tab.

Make a list, check it twice

The Notes application has also received quite a few upgrades. The most useful of these is the ability to turn any list into a checklist with a click of a button. If you have an unformatted list in a note, highlight it, right-click, and click the checklist button to transform it. You’ll also be able to check each item off your list as you complete it.

Off the menu

Do you enjoy how the dock hides for most of the time and only appears when you scroll over it? Ever wish the menu bar would do the same? If so, there is some more great news for you. All you need to do is go to System Preferences and then to General Settings. Once there, you will see an option to Automatically hide and show the menu bar which, if activated, will see the menu bar disappear unless scrolled over.

No more cursing at your cursor

One of the features El Capitan users are so far enjoying the most is also one of the handiest. You can locate your cursor quicker than ever before by moving your finger back and forth on the trackpad, or simply by shaking your mouse.The pointer increases in size, allowing you to locate it with ease.

We understand that switching to a new operating system can be difficult. Let our experts explain the pros and cons of an OS upgrade, and help ensure a smooth transition should you wish to make the change.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
September 2nd, 2015

164_A_MacIf you left your desk now, how would you know if your Mac is secure? What if a nosy employee or passerbyer decided to snoop around on your machine when you’re not around? Or what if your Mac is stolen while it’s still powered on? The thief will have unlimited access to all your confidential files and data, and there’s nothing you’ll be able to do about it. Well, not any longer; here’s how you can lock your Mac easily every time you step away from your computer.

The problem with normal password lock

As you know, the normal way to lock your Mac is by either shutting it down or logging off. So if you’re simply stepping out of your office to use the bathroom, you probably don’t want to waste time doing either of these to keep your desktop secure from a snooping passerbyer. So what’s to do? Set up a password lock. This allows you to lock your Mac by simply putting it to sleep.

How to set up a password lock

One of the best parts about setting up a password lock on your Mac is that it’s incredibly easy. To do so, click on the following:
  1. System Preferences
  2. Security & Privacy (located under the “Personal” group of icons)
  3. General tab
  4. Check the box that reads, “require password after sleep or screen saver begins”
Once you’ve done this, choose “immediately” from the box that lights up. Now, your Mac will lock every time it goes to sleep, and to use it again your password will need to be entered.

So, that leaves one more question. How can you easily put your Mac to sleep?

How to make your Mac go to sleep on command

There are several easy ways to do this. The first and probably the one you’re most familiar with is to simply click on the Apple icon in the upper left hand corner of your screen, and then click Sleep.

If you prefer keyboard shortcuts, you can use one of the following:

  1. Control + Shift + Eject - this makes only the screen go to sleep
  2. Command + Option + Eject - this makes the computer go to sleep
Probably the easiest way of all is to activate Hot Corners, which allows you to put your monitor to sleep by simply moving your cursor to a specific corner of the screen. To activate this, click on the following:
  1. System Preferences
  2. Desktop & Screensaver
  3. Screensaver
  4. Hot Corners (in the bottom right hand corner)
Then choose the corner you would like to use to put your monitor to sleep, and select “Put Display to Sleep”. Every time you navigate your cursor to that corner of the screen, your monitor will go to sleep and your Mac will be locked.

Looking for more Mac OS tips? Curious to learn about our Mac services? Call us today to learn more.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
July 25th, 2015

164_A_MacLater this fall, Apple will be releasing their new operating system, El Capitan. For all those Mac lovers who are anxiously chomping at the bit to test out this new OS, you’re in luck. A beta version has been released, and users can sign up to try it out through the Apple Beta Software Program. Though if you’d rather learn about the features first, here are four exciting ones people are talking about.

Find your cursor more easily

While not the most difficult of problems computer users face, many of us have all probably ran into the situation where we lose the cursor and have to carefully scan the screen and wiggle the mouse to find it. El Capitan resolves this minor annoyance in a fun way. Now if you lose your cursor, you can wiggle your finger on the trackpad and the cursor will blow up to a larger size which makes it easier to spot instantly.

Better Spotlight feature

El Capitan’s new version of Spotlight now allows you to search news and information from the Internet. For example, you can use it to find the weather forecast, sports scores, stock market information and even videos from Vimeo and YouTube.

Another useful feature of the updated Spotlight is the ability to use natural language to find files on your Mac. That means you can search for locally stored files with phrases such as “video I edited last week”, which will then bring up results for any videos you edited in that time period.

Run apps side by side in a split screen

Deciding how to best handle multiple windows on your display can be a daily annoyance. If you have too many open, your screen can become a disorganized mess that leaves you less productive and perhaps even with a headache. Split view aims to bring order to your display by allowing you to go full screen with a pair of apps running side by side. Similar to the Windows 8 split-screen app, you can also resize each window to your liking.

More functional Notes app

With El Capitan, the Notes application has also gotten a makeover and now allows you to add a variety of types of content. For instance, you can drop in videos, pictures, PDFs and other file types directly into the application. Even better, you can sync Safari with Notes. This means that with a simple click of your trackpad, you can send content from a web page directly to the app.

Last but not least, Notes now gives users the ability to create checklists easily. With a single click, you can turn a bulleted list into an interactive checklist. So whether you’re looking to create a to-do list, grocery list or wish list, Notes has you covered.

While it’s worth noting that none of these new features are revolutionary, these small improvements will come as a welcome upgrade of Yosemite for many Mac users.

Want more of the latest Mac news? Need to service your Apple IT? Feel free to give us a call today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
June 23rd, 2015

Hardware_Jun11_AFor keen users of Apple technology across the globe, the technology giant’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is the event to watch for news of the company’s latest projects and upcoming releases. This year’s WWDC took place earlier this month in San Francisco, with the keynote speech giving a rundown of what Apple has on the cards in the months and years to come. Here are the big takeaways you should be aware of.

New operating systems

The big news from the WWDC was about operating systems. Apple took the opportunity to unveil three new releases - for mobile devices, Mac desktops and laptops, and the Apple Watch. Access to all three has been given to developers as of now, with public beta testing and full availability expected to follow later in the year.


On the mobile front, iOS 9 ups the ante on intelligence, with a focus on allowing devices to learn more about our behavior and so tailor the user experience to suit. At the root of these improvements are upgrades to both Siri and search; expect mobile devices running iOS 9 to be better at launching apps before you realize you need them - great for productivity - and reminding you about (and getting you to) upcoming meetings and appointments. Among other changes, upgrades to the iPad will enable enhanced productivity and multitasking, great news for the hurried business user who needs to make the most of the time available.


The desktop and laptop operating system upgrade to OS X 10.11 is seen as a stepping stone from Yosemite rather than an entirely new approach - but it’s a significant upgrade all the same. Among the most exciting developments are search improvements that will allow you to use natural language when you’re on the hunt for important information and files; likewise, the release is intended to make multitasking across windows even more of a breeze. The productivity and communication apps most commonly used by our business clients - the likes of Mail, Safari and Notes - have also been tuned up both in terms of visible features and behind-the-scenes upgrades to their running speed and overall performance.


Finally, though the Apple Watch might not yet be at the stage of being a game-changer on the office productivity scene, the second release of its operating system lays the way for an enhanced user experience. watchOS 2 will, most crucially, lessen the requirement for you to use your iPhone alongside your watch - one of the notable drawbacks when the watch came on sale - and instead allow the device to do more, and run more apps, on its own.

Apple also used WWDC to reveal details of improvements to Apple Maps that will see the service include transit information for cities including San Francisco, New York and London - making it easier for you to get to your meeting on time if you’re taking public transportation. Equally exciting is the news that Apple Pay continues to grow; the mobile payment system is being rolled out to more and more retailers across the US, and is making the jump across the pond to the United Kingdom, where it’s being rolled out in banks, stores and on public transportation.

Want to learn more about the latest Apple technology developments, and how you can put them to use to drive greater efficiency in your business? Talk to our helpful team today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
June 12th, 2015

164_A_MacMost Mac users love the user-friendly, easy-to-navigate interface the Apple brand is known for. But did you know that using your Mac can be even easier? It’s hard to believe, but if you’ve never taken the time to get familiar with your system’s shortcuts, there are a few that are sure to save you hours of time in the long run and bring a new level of usability and ease to your beloved Mac.

Open Programs and Files Faster

Want a quicker way to open files and programs faster? If you’re tired of opening Finder and scrolling through the hundreds of applications and files you have stored, there is a much more efficient solution - Spotlight Search.

To use Spotlight Search, follow these steps:

  1. Press Command and the space bar to launch your search.
  2. Type the first few letters of the file or app you’d like to open.
  3. From the drop down menu that appears, scroll down to the app or file you’re searching for and hit the enter key.

Force Quit Apps

When the pinwheel of death rears its ugly head, your application stalls and your productivity comes to a standstill. There is no better time to make use of the Force Quit shortcut. Here’s how to do it.
  1. Press Command-Option-Esc to display the list of all applications that are running.
  2. From here simply choose the one you’d like to quit.

Take a Screenshot

Pictures speak a thousand words, and sometimes you may need an image of your display to more thoroughly communicate a message. Here are three easy ways to take a screenshot on your Mac OS.
  • Take a snapshot of your entire display - press Command-Shift-3.
  • Take a screenshot of any open window - press Command-Shift-4, followed by the space bar. Then, simply click on the window you’d like an image of.
  • Snap a customized image of your display - press Command-Shift-4. When the crosshairs appear, use them to drag a frame over the portion of the screen you’d like to capture.

Launch frequently used Apps, Files and Server Connections automatically

This trick allows you to save time by automatically launching a program when you log in. Follow these steps to do this:
  1. Go to System Preferences
  2. Choose Users & Groups
  3. Select your account
  4. Click on Login Items
  5. Use the plus and minus signs to add or remove programs, files, folders, etc. you’d like to automatically launch upon login
  6. Click Add to save
These are just a few of the dozens of shortcuts and features Mac OS has to offer. If you’d like to learn more or need other IT-related assistance, don’t hesitate to contact us.
Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
May 2nd, 2015

AppleMacOS_May01_APhoto lovers can now rejoice, along with all those who have long bemoaned the shortcomings of the dated iPhoto app on your Apple desktop and laptop devices. With its release of the latest update to its Yosemite operating system - which comes out as version OS X 10.10.3 - the computing giant has replaced iPhoto with an all-new Photos app. If that whets your appetite, here’s what else you need to know about Apple’s shift on the photo front and what to expect from your new photography companion.

Clean design

The new program incorporates design and user experience features that have more in common with the iOS mobile operating system on the iPhone and iPad, as part of apparent wider efforts on Apple’s part to bring the two closer together (Photos for iOS has been available since last September). This means Photos now looks like much like an iOS app - think a single screen with a primary focus on displaying images. Distracting widgets have been left by the wayside, though if you were a fan of iPhoto’s easy-access sidebar, you can quickly re-enable that. Apple is also expected to discontinue Aperture, the editing app used primarily by photography experts, and Photos now acts as a middle ground between that and the more amateur-targeted app iPhoto.

At-a-glance view

The new Photos app allows you to review your photos and videos in seven views - Years, Collections, Moments, Photos, Shared, Albums and Projects. The Years view zooms you right out to see tiny thumbnails of all the photos you took that year; it’s something of a mesmerizing mosaic collage of miniature dots of color. Similar in nature to the Events view you were used to in iPhoto, you can move around and click on individual images to bring up a larger preview. Alternatively, scroll through the images using your keyboard to view previews of every photo. Another tap on the preview brings up the full-size, high-resolution version; instant rendering means this happens in a flash.

The Moments view groups photos taken at one specific event, like your office party. This feature was also available in iPhoto but has been streamlined and smoothed out. Photos uses the time and place the photos were taken to group in the Moments view - a slight difference to the Collections view, which focuses on location, and so can amass shots taken on, say, a vacation, even if they span multiple days.

The Photos view shows you every image in your library, while Shared displays those shared or accessed on iCloud. Albums gives access to those created yourself or configured by the app. Finally, Projects is another enhanced iPhoto feature, enabling you to review photos you’ve used to produce slideshows and physical products. With the exception of wirebound books and small softcover books, which are no longer supported, you can use Photos to edit and reorder products you created in iPhoto.

Enhanced editing

Though Photos is not intended as a fully-fledged replacement for the Aperture app, the nonetheless relatively sophisticated editing capabilities of iPhoto are carried across to the new app. Between the ability to make changes to specific individual elements of a photo’s technical make-up, and smart sliders that intelligently adjust multiple elements, you can execute quality photo touch-ups whether you’re a beginner or a pro. Eight Instagram-style filters give added flexibility, too, including several vintage and black-and-white numbers - we particularly like Instant and Noir.

Pinch and zoom

Carrying on the iOS theme, Photos allows you to navigate and manipulate your photos just as though you were on your iPhone. You can pinch and zoom on your Mac’s touchpad to zoom in and out of different photos, and with a few taps you can easily switch between screens. There is even support for keystroke gestures to allow you to effortlessly browse your entire photo collection. This gives the whole experience much more glide than we had become used to with the increased sluggishness of the past-its-prime iPhoto.

Cloud power

Of course, shifting everything to the cloud is the general direction these days - and it makes particular sense with space-greedy photos and videos. Your entire library of shots is automatically added to iCloud Photo Library and so available across all your Apple devices, which now employ the same familiar and easy-to-use navigation. Edits are instantly synced between devices and, in an effort to save space, full-resolution photos and videos are stored on iCloud rather than locally.

The new Photos app sees Apple keeping pace with our ever increasing demands for speed and flexibility as amateur and professional photographers alike. To find out more about putting Photos and other Mac apps to use in your business, give us a call.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
March 28th, 2015

AppleMacOS_Mar27_AApple announced the release of an all-new MacBook at its Spring Forward Apple Watch event earlier this month. This latest innovation in the MacBook family is simply named the New MacBook, creating a new product line alongside the existing MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. Here’s a rundown of the New MacBook’s specs and features, and how they might impact your work if you’re thinking of using one.


You’ll be amazed how compact the New MacBook is. It is currently the thinnest notebook Apple has to offer, measuring only 13.1 millimeters in thickness. It is also very light, weighing only two pounds, or less than a kilogram. MacBook series usually come in silver, but the New MacBook is available in Space Gray and Gold hues, similar to the iPhone and iPad.


The New MacBook sports a high-definition Retina display, with a resolution of 2304x1440 pixels. The 12-inch display screen is wide and roomy enough to engage with web browsing, applications and programs efficiently.

Keyboard and Trackpad

Apple has always incorporated some of the best keyboard and trackpad technologies in its MacBook machines. A big keyboard change sees the traditional scissor mechanism replaced with a butterfly mechanism, offering users a better typing experience. The butterfly mechanism is wider and is made from a stiffer material, meaning that it’s more stable, responsive, and takes up less vertical space.

In addition to keyboard improvements, Apple has also made changes to its trackpad. The new Force Touch Trackpad is pressure sensitive, and can tell the difference between a tap and a click. You can take advantage of the Force Touch and find new ways to interact with the MacBook, such as activating certain applications by putting more pressure on the trackpad.

Silent operation

The New MacBook doesn’t need a built-in fan to cool itself down. With the assistance of Intel’s Core M chip, the New MacBook generates less heat, and disperses sidewards the heat that it does create. It will remain cool and virtually silent, even when you open multiple programs.

Battery life

Apple has made major improvements in the New MacBook’s battery capacity, despite its thinner and lighter design. The newly-designed battery extends the New MacBook’s life further, allowing up to nine hours of web browsing, or ten hours of watching videos.

Price and release date

The New MacBook will retail between $1500 and $2000, depending on specifications. Apple will begin selling the New MacBook on April 10 through its online store.

To learn more about how your business can benefit from using Mac devices, give us a call today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
January 21st, 2015

AppleMacOS_Jan16_AThe New Year is a great time to brush up on skills that can drive greater productivity and efficiency, or just save you time in completing routine IT tasks. Whether you are a long-term Mac user or have recently converted to the Apple way, it can be easy to fall into a rut of thinking you know your way around your system, when in fact there is always something new to learn. So by learning these tips, your Mac will be taking you to increased work effectiveness in no time!

Make searching easier

Need to hunt down a file? You can make the process easier by not searching for just one word, or even a series of words in sequence, but by instead searching for a logical combination of terms as a Boolean expression. Boolean expressions combine search terms with conditions like ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘not’ to specify whether you want results that contain all, or only some, of your search terms. These expressions are supported by native Mac apps including Spotlight, Mail and Calendar, and by plenty of third-party apps too.

For instance, if you wanted to track down client invoices that have not yet been marked as paid, you might begin by searching for files containing the word ‘invoice’. This term alone would bring up plenty of results you had no interest in, but by using a Boolean expression which takes the terms ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘not’ to create a logical statement, you could run a search for ‘invoice NOT paid’.

Protect your passwords

We’ve all heard the recommendation that our passwords should be long, difficult to guess and full of unnatural-feeling characters like mixed-case letters, numbers and punctuation - easier said than put into practice. Add to that the fact that, if we want to be truly secure, we shouldn’t use the same password for more than one account, and suddenly creating hack-proof passwords becomes a real challenge. Even once you’ve invented them, how on earth are you supposed to remember all of these different passwords?

Well, there’s an app for that. Or several, to be precise - the Apple-specific iCloud Keychain syncs your passwords across your devices and then fills them in when necessary, remembering what you can’t. On other operating systems, 1Password and LastPass are good alternatives.

Simplify your coding

Does your day-to-day work involve writing of some kind? You can make your job simpler by forgetting often difficult to read HTML code in favour of much friendlier, more attractive and easier to work with Markdown code. Based on plain text, Markdown is compatible with almost all word processors, meaning you don’t need to worry about using a specific text editor for fear of risking the corruption of your code. Simplified codes, such as Marketing to create a hyperlink, are transformed into formatted documents by a converter that takes the effort out of writing.

Numerous versions of Markdown have expanded upon the original idea to add additional features and bring further design richness to your finished document, but all of them offer the basics you’ll need to produce in your writing. Examples of apps that act as dedicated Markdown editors are Marked 2, iA Writer and Editorial.

If you’re looking to learn more about productivity tips or other Mac features, get in touch today and see what we can do to help.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
January 7th, 2015

osx_Dec25_AAs we look ahead to new tech developments for 2015, we also appreciate what an interesting past year it has been for Apple, with new versions of iOS, OS X, iPhones, and iPads released. The company has undoubtedly a lot to offer businesses, but the question is, with such a good year in 2014, what can we expect from Apple in the year ahead?

1. Apple focuses more on business solutions

Early in 2014, Apple announced that they would be entering a long-term partnership with enterprise giant IBM. The idea behind this was that Apple would work with IBM to develop a better way to bring mobile solutions to businesses and whole industries.

Up until now there has been little announced beyond this initial partnership. However, you can expect that both IBM and Apple are working on big developments that could debut in 2015. One indicator of this is the way many Apple products, mobile devices especially, are being integrated into businesses. Most devices, like the iPad, enter the business via an employee bringing them to the office (BYOD), and using their own device for work.

While this has worked well for many companies, the business side (apps, marketing, company-wide management, etc.) has largely been lacking or unsupported. It is a fair belief to think that Apple will continue to develop products in 2015, but leverage the IBM partnership to make devices easier to use and integrate into business; while also taking advantage of IBM's wide industry expertise to launch industry-specific apps and services.

2. A larger iPad

Rumors started to fly about Apple developing a larger iPad for release some time in 2015. The word is that they are working on a 12.9 inch device that is supposedly being slated to be a replacement for low-end PC's small netbooks. This device could be great for businesses, especially those with employees who are on the road a lot, or who work directly with clients. Think about it: A highly portable tablet with enough screen space to run most apps, combined with a subscription to Office 365 or Google Apps, with a possible keyboard case. It could very well be a great solution for many businesses.

We can't say when, or 100% for sure if this device will be released, but signs and rumors are pointing to a likely launch in 2015.

3. Apple Watch

This prediction is pretty much a no-brainer, largely because it has already been announced. Scheduled to be released in the spring of 2015, the Apple Watch should be the accessory of the year. Like most other Apple products, this will no doubt be a popular product with high demand from the domestic market.

At this time however, it really doesn't look like there will be much use for this product for businesses for the time being. Sure, it provides a convenient way to interact with your phone, but many businesses will likely see it as more of a distraction than a help. That being said, some employees will probably purchase one privately so you do need to aware of this device, especially when it comes to your BYOD program and if the device is used for business activities.

4. An incremental update to the iPhone

With 2014 seeing the release of both the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, Apple brought some high-powered devices to the market that were a big step up over even the iPhone 5. In 2015, Apple will likely have a hard time outdoing the iPhone 6, so will possibly introduce a small update to the phone instead.

This version will probably have an improved processor and some small improvements that will make the phone a little more competitive against other devices released in the coming year. We don't however expect an iPhone 7 or 7 Plus this year.

5. A smaller update to OS X

The past two years have seen back-to-back big versions of OS X drop. The most recent version, Yosemite, was a new design introduced along with a number of new features that brought the desktop operating system closer to Apple's mobile operating system iOS.

In 2015 you can expect a new version of OS X to be unveiled and likely released, but we are pretty sure that it won't be as big of an update as the last two. From what Apple has said about these systems, it looks like most features introduced in the next version of OS X will bring the iOS and OS X even closer together.

We're curious to know what you would like to see from Apple in 2015. Let us know! And if you would like to learn more about implementing any existing Apple devices into your business, contact us today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
November 26th, 2014

OSX_Nov24_AWith the recent launch of OS X Yosemite, Apple also released a number of new software updates, including a new version of their Internet browser - Safari. What is really great about Safari, as with all other Apple apps, is that there are a large number of useful keyboard shortcuts that make using the browser just that much easier. Here are seven you may not know.

1. Scroll up and down a screen

While you can use your mouse to scroll, if you are on a laptop or need to quickly scan down one screen, you can press the spacebar. This will move the page down one screen (based on your current screen size). You can move up one screen by pressing Shift + Spacebar.

2. Open a page in a new tab

If you are looking at a page with a link that you would like to click and open, but you would like to also keep the existing page open, you can do so by simply pressing Command + clicking on the link. When you do this, the link will open in a new tab. You can also use this shortcut with bookmarks, and if you are entering a URL, hit Command + Return to open the URL in a new tab.

3. Open and close tabs

If you would like to quickly open a new tab in the same Safari window, press Command + T and it should open to the right of the tab you are currently looking at. If you would like to close the tab you are looking at, press Command + W. Should you accidently close the wrong tab, hitting Command + Z will reopen the closed tab, as long as you have not entered any information in say an address field or form.

4. Cycle between open tabs

Because of the tabbed nature of Safari, there is a good chance that you have one window open with multiple tabs. While you can simply click on the tab you want to switch to, you can also use Control + tab to switch to the tab to the right of the currently open one. Pressing Shift + Control + tab will switch to the tab to the left of the currently open one.

5. See a list of recent pages by Web address

When working in Safari, you can press and hold on the back arrow to view a list of recent pages you have visited. The problem with this is that sometimes you see just the page name, so if you have looked at a site with a long name, or the same pages, it can be tough to pick the right one to go back to.

Instead, press Option + the back arrow to bring up the list of recently viewed pages and their URL or Web address. This only works for the tab you are currently looking at.

6. Go to your homepage

If you would like to quickly go back to your homepage, press Command + Home key. This should automatically load the page you have set as your homepage.

7. Add page as a bookmark and open pages from your Favorites Bar

You can add the page you are currently looking at to your bookmark list by hitting Command + D. To open pages from your Favorites bar (shown below the URL bar) hit Command + 1-9. For example, if you hit Command + 3, you will open the third site on the bar (counting from the left). If you can't see the Favorites Bar, press View and select Show Favorites Bar.

If you would like to learn more about Safari, and other Apple apps, contact us today.

Published with permission from Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS